FERMENTED FOODS AND COMPUTER SCREEN

FERMENT YOUR FOODS

Whether you make them or buy them, eating fermented foods regularly, if not daily, could be a lifesaver. What exactly are fermented foods, which, by the way, earned the number one spot among superfoods of 2018 in a Today’s Dietitian survey? They’re basically foods that have been produced in a way to encourage good bacteria to grow, something people have been doing for centuries. Examples include sauerkraut, kimchi, tempeh, kombucha, kefir, and miso.

Those fermented foods—and their accompanying bacteria—can offer your health a huge boost. They give your gut microbiome the food it needs to thrive, which means you could experience benefits like a stronger immune system, better digestion, and weight loss. Studies have also found that fermented veggies like kimchi can prevent cancer, lower cholesterol, and improve insulin sensitivity. Could they help you live longer? It’s possible, as some of the longest-living folks in the world reportedly eat fermented foods daily.

DON’T SQUINT AT YOUR COMPUTER SCREEN

Ever heard of computer face? It’s an emerging term, but it’s essentially all of the squinting and frowning you do with your face (most of which you probably don’t even notice) when you’re using a computer or any screen. Do this repetitively day in and day out, and over time you’ll age your skin prematurely. Everything from wrinkles and frown lines to deeper wrinkles can result. You could also develop turkey neck  just by looking down a lot.

To combat this, identify if you’re straining to see the screen. If so, visit your optometrist to get your vision checked. Even more important, use good ergonomics when working at your computer so you don’t have to squint and crinkle your face every time you look at the screen. First, position your monitor so that the top is about two to three inches above your eye level and you’re not getting any glare from outdoor or indoor light (it helps to place computers at a right angle to windows and use blinds or curtains). Sit (or stand) about an arm’s length away.

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